Tag Archives: WiHM8

Guest Post: Anne Hogue-Boucher

For the last post I get to host this week for Women In Horror Month, let me introduce my friend Spellvira, Anne Hogue-Boucher – Queen of the Macabre on Fun With Torture.

One of my favorite pastimes is torture.

Oh yes, not so much in real life, please, especially not if it’s someone I like or love. No, I like to write about torture, and I adore torturing all of my characters to varying degrees.

Psychological torture is fairly easy for me. I’ve seen it happen in real life, firsthand, in my own past and when working as a supervised therapist at a psychiatric hospital. People in the hospital were tortured trying to get help for Major Depressive Disorder, Schizophrenia, Bipolar I & II, and many other conditions. It did not inspire my writing, but it gave me a glimpse into a person’s world where they were convinced they were being watched, stalked, poisoned, and other horrible things were happening to them.
So giving it a supernatural element and casting it into my own world, the world of Silver Hollow, wasn’t a difficult task. But it was necessary. Writing about characters who may or may not understand they’re enduring the supernatural or otherworldly/inter-dimensional is a way to cope with the actual evils I have seen in my life. It keeps me stable, I suppose.

When I first published Now Entering Silver Hollow, some people were shocked by it because there are some brutal moments where characters are stretched to their psychological limit. One of my favorite characters, in fact, gets put on the literary rack and nearly pulled apart.

Her name is Kathryn Cross, MD. She believes in logic and none of the supernatural nonsense I put in front of her. Of course, encountering these things drives her to the edge of madness. She is ravaged by it, and somehow manages to pull herself together.

But that’s the appeal of psychological torture, isn’t it? At least for me. I’m fascinated by people who can go through the very worst and yet manage to keep going. I’m intrigued by their coping mechanisms (healthy or not), and impressed by the human spirit’s strength to carry on no matter what. The will to survive is at the core of enduring psychological torture. Some of my characters have it, and some don’t.

I think that’s what appeals to fans of psychological horror. It’s not just the thrill of what might happen next to such-and-such a character, it’s thinking about how they would survive such a thing. Perhaps there’s even an element of ‘thank goodness that’s not me’ in there, too. Some also seem to enjoy it for the same reason I do: watching characters survive some of the most maddening and horrible events.

Writing about torture is fun. I’d write about it any day over enduring it myself. I can imagine anyone would, and that’s likely one of the reasons why psychological horror has such a wide appeal.

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Guest Post from Lori R. Lopez

Welcome to Women In Horror month!

I’m proud to host Lori R. Lopez today to talk abut

Select Your Weapons Carefully

Lori’s novels are dark or fantastic. Her poems are horrific or witty. Her stories could be anything, except some things. Her artwork is peculiar, brooding, and quirky like her!

I select weapons carefully and strive for accuracy. My story “Cornstalker” in the anthology DEAD HARVEST featured several medieval blades, which were fun to include. A slender axe was named Francesca, the mace called Morning Star. There was a battle-axe mentioned too, with double blades, and a warhammer. But the biggest and most formidable weapon of the story was a Mack Truck hauling a trailer. I had to research how to drive one so I could describe it. I don’t drive, period. I used a variety of things in the title tale for my horror collection ODDS AND ENDS: from glass shards and a chainsaw to the blades of a blender, hatchets and axes, flies and birds, a weed-trimmer . . . It’s a bit twisted.

I also like to use objects that aren’t actual weapons or even considered dangerous. My works usually contain humor, whatever the other genres involved, and you never know what might happen. Playing cards were flung like knives during a scene for “Mindless”, an apocalyptic story published in ODDS AND ENDS. I was thinking about how painful a papercut can be and thought, Why not?

The latest weapon I’ve wielded for writing was an Excalibur replica in a new dark poem, “monsters and men” . . . although the pen is mightier than the sword, as we know. The piece centers on the power of words.

Website: http://www.fairyflyentertainment.com
Amazon: http://amazon.com/author/lorirlopez
GoodReads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1455488.Lori_R_Lopez
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lorirlopez

And thanks to W.J. Howard for organizing all of the fun!